Kano Reports Suspected Case of Monkeypox

The Kano State government through its Commissioner for Health, Dr. Kabul Getso, has confirmed that a suspected case of Monkeypox has been recorded in Bebeji Local Government Area of the state.

Whilst informing journalists on Saturday Kano that the blood sample of the victim had been sent to Abuja for clinical verification, Getso said “One of the symptoms of the disease was noticed in the patient, but we are suspecting that the disease is more of Chickens pox than monkey pox… The State also identified 60 people who had contacts with the victims and all of them have been quarantined.

“For now only 11 States are affected by the monkeypox disease and 94 persons are the victims out of which only six are confirmed. The Kano case from Bebeji Local Government is yet to be confirmed. The blood sampling will take three weeks before it is ready.”

Medical and animal science experts have warned of possible outbreak of more zoonotic disease if regulating human-animal relationships is not made an agenada on public health issues.

Monkeypox is a rare zoonotic disease caused by contact with the monkeypox virus that belongs to the same family of viruses that include Variola Virus.

The Monkeypox virus can cause an illness with a generalised vesicular skin rash, fever and painful jaw swelling. Previous outbreaks have led to death in about 1 to 10 per cent of infected cases.
There is no specific medicine to treat the disease, but intensive supportive care helps patients to recover fully.

Mugabe Now WHO Disease “Ambassador”

President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe has been appointed as a “goodwill ambassador” of the World Health Organisation (WHO), to help tackle non-communicable diseases.

New WHO head Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus praised Zimbabwe for its commitment to public health.

However, critics say Zimbabwe’s healthcare system has collapsed, with the president and many of his senior ministers going abroad for treatment.

They say that staff are often unpaid and medicines are in short supply.

Dr Tedros, who is Ethiopian, is the first African to lead the WHO and replaced Margaret Chan, who stepped down from her 10-year post in June.

He was elected with a mandate to tackle perceived politicisation in the organisation.

The WHO head praised Zimbabwe as “a country that places universal health coverage and health promotion at the centre of its policies to provide healthcare to all”.

But U.S.-based campaign group Human Rights Watch said it was an embarrassment to give the ambassador role to Mr Mugabe given his record on human rights.

“If you look at Zimbabwe, Mugabe’s corruption, his utter mismanagement of the economy has devastated health services there,” said executive director Kenneth Roth.

“Indeed, you know, Mugabe himself travels abroad for his health care. He’s been to Singapore three times this year already. His senior officials go to South Africa for their health care.

“When you go to Zimbabwean hospitals, they lack the most basic necessities.”

“The idea of hailing Mr Mugabe “as any kind of example of positive contribution to health care is absolutely absurd,” he added.

BBC