Tinubu’s Daughter Welcomes Baby Boy Through Surrogacy

Shade Tinubu-Ojo, first daughter of the National leader of the All Progressives Congress, APC, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu has welcomed her first baby, a boy, through surrogacy.

According to reports, the baby was born on 25 December, 2017 through surrogacy to the Tinubu-Ojo family, who have been expecting a baby several years after marriage.

Despite fact that the baby was born through surrogacy, there is joy in the Tinubu-Ojo’s family that at last the Iya-Oloja General is now a proud mother.

The naming ceremony of the baby has been fixed for Monday, January 1, 2018.

Surrogacy is an agreement between two parties, whereby a woman agrees to carry a pregnancy for another person or persons, who will become the newborn child’s parent after birth.



Wi-fi And Cellphones Increases Risk Of Miscarriage- Research

A new research reveals that Wi-fi and cellphones increase pregnant women’s risk of suffering a miscarriage by nearly 50 percent, new research reveals.

Magnetic field (MF) non-ionizing radiation, which is also given off by power lines and cell towers, has been found in past studies to put a stress on the body, leading to genetic damage that can cause pregnant women to miscarry.

Those exposed to the highest levels of MF radiation are 48 percent more likely to lose their baby than women exposed to the lowest amounts, the United States (U.S.) study found

MF radiation, which everyone is exposed to at some extent, has previously been linked to cancer and has been recommended by the World Health Organization to be studied for its effect on pregnancies.

Miscarriages affect between 15 and 20 percent of pregnancies in the US. They are defined as losing babies less than 20 weeks into their gestation.

The findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports.

How was the research carried out? Researchers from the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California, analyzed 913 pregnant women at varying stages of their gestation.

Some of the study’s participants had previously suffered at least one miscarriage.

All of the participants carried an EMDEX Lite meter, which measures MF-radiation exposure, for 24 hours on a typical day.

Their pregnancy outcomes were followed for the duration of their gestation.

Results reveal pregnant women with the highest MF-radiation exposure have a 48 percent greater risk of miscarrying than those with the lowest exposure.

Among pregnant women exposed to the highest levels of MF radiation, 24.2 per cent had a miscarriage compared to 10.4 per cent of those exposed to the lowest amounts.

This risk occurs regardless of whether women have suffered miscarriages in the past and are therefore more likely to lose another baby before its birth.