Kim Jong-Un Writes Donald Trump ‘A Nice Note’

North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-Un, has written a letter to U.S. President Donald Trump.

Trump, in a tweet acknowledging the letter, described it as “a very nice note” adding, “great progress being made’’.

“A very nice note from Chairman Kim of North Korea. Great progress being made!’’ Trump tweeted.

The letter which was dated July 6, Kim recalled the historic meeting between the two leaders in Singapore on June 12, saying it was the start of a meaningful journey.

Kim said: “The significant first meeting with Your Excellency and the joint statement that we signed together in Singapore 24 days ago was indeed the start of a meaningful journey.

“I deeply appreciate the energetic and extraordinary efforts made by Your Excellency Mr President for the improvement of relations between the two countries and the faithful implementation of the joint statement.

“I firmly believe that the strong will, sincere efforts and unique approach of myself and Your Excellency Mr President aimed at opening up a new future between the DPRK and the U.S. will surely come to fruition.

“Wishing that the invariable trust and confidence in Your Excellency Mr President will be further strengthened in the future process of taking practical actions.

“I extend my conviction that the epochal progress in promoting the DPRK-U.S. relations will bring our next meeting forward’’.

There were reports that North Korea had, rather than dismantled its nuclear programme, satellite images showed that it was actually upgrading its nuclear facilities.

Following the reports, Trump had, however, expressed “confidence” that Kim would honour the contract they signed in Singapore.

Trump, on Monday, tweeted: “I have confidence that Kim Jong Un will honour the contract we signed &, even more importantly, our handshake.

“We agreed to the denuclearization of North Korea.

“China, on the other hand, maybe exerting negative pressure on a deal because of our posture on Chinese Trade-Hope Not!’’

Trump And Kim Hold Historic Meeting In Singapore

Steadily, almost warily, the two leaders approached each other on a collonaded verandah, their hands outstretched as a gaggle of media watched from a platform and the rest of the world looked on.

Weeks in the making after decades of war, antagonism and venom, the first encounter between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump was a crucial moment.

Within the first minute in Singapore, the US president had proclaimed, he would know whether a deal over the North’s nuclear arsenal was possible.

The drive to the venue took both men through the tourist enclave of Sentosa island and past the towers of Shrek’s castle at a Universal Studios theme park.

But they emerged from their limousines grim and unsmiling, and the first few moments of their meeting appeared uneasy.

As the two shook hands for around 13 seconds, Trump reached out to touch Kim’s shoulder, looking down at the shorter man as he spoke.

The two turned to face the cameras in front of a dozen American and North Korean flags, upright and unsmiling.

But as Trump ushered the North Korean towards their meeting room, Kim’s lips creased into the beginnings of a smile, and the two men visibly relaxed the moment they turned off the stage at the Capella Hotel.

They chatted and smiled as they went into the first-ever one-on-one encounter between a leader of the North and a sitting US president.

The first minute of the meeting, Trump said, had felt “really great”.

“I think it’s going to be really successful and I think we will have a terrific relationship, I have no doubt.”

‘Not easy’

Held on a former British military base, the summit came 65 years after Pyongyang’s Chinese-backed forces fought the US-led UN coalition to a standstill in the Korean War, and followed years of increasing tensions over the North’s banned nuclear and ballistic weapons programmes.

According to the South Korean news agency Yonhap, it was the first time the US and North Korean emblems had been officially displayed side-by-side since the New York Philharmonic played a concert in Pyongyang in 2008.

In Seoul, South Korean President Moon Jae-in — whose country remains technically at war with the North — watched live ahead of a cabinet meeting.

“I, too, could hardly sleep last night,” he told his ministers, hoping for a “new era among the two Koreas and the United States”.

Sitting across from Trump at a small side table, Kim told the US president through a translator: “It was not easy to get here.

“The past worked as fetters on our limbs and the old prejudices and practices worked as obstacles on our way forward,” he went on, his listener looking him in the eye and nodding. “But we overcame all of them and we are here today.”

Trump responded “That’s true,” before another handshake — smiling this time — and a thumbs-up from the US president.

The clasps represented an agreement to overcome decades of hostile relations, said Koh Yu-hwan, a professor at Dongguk University.

It was more formal than Kim’s encounters with his neighbours — the North Korean leader used both hands when he met Chinese President Xi Jinping and embraced the South’s President Moon Jae-in at their second summit in the Demilitarized Zone last month.

But Koh told AFP: “Right now, it’s the first meeting between the heads of two enemy states so they can’t exchange friendly hugs.

“Technically, we are still in a state of war,” he added. “But if the talks go well, they could end it with a hug.

AFP

Kim Jong Un lands In Singapore Ahead Of Summit

Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) leader Kim Jong Un landed in Singapore on Sunday, two days ahead of the submit with US President Donald Trump.

After his arrival, Kim is due to meet Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore’s ministry of foreign affairs said.The planned Trump-Kim summit is due to take place at 9 a.m. local time on Tuesday at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa Island.

Donald Trump Finally Speaks To Kim Jong Un

The President of the United States, Donald Trump has revealed that he has indeed directly spoken to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un making history in the diplomatic relationship between the United States and communist North Korea.

President Trump told visiting Japanese PM Shinzo Abe that the US has started direct talks with the DPRK at “very high levels.”

 

North Korean Leader Meets South Korean Government Officials

According to North Korea’s Official news agency, its leader Kim Jong Un has met with senior South Korean government officials for the first time and said it is his “firm will to vigorously advance” inter-Korean ties and pursue reunification.

The National Security Office head Chung Eui-yong lead the 10-member South Korean delegation to the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, on Monday in hopes of encouraging North Korea and the U. S. to talk to one another.

Washington and Pyongyang have been at loggerheads for months over the North’s nuclear and missile programs, with U.S. President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un trading insults and threatening war.

Tensions between the two Koreas eased during the recent Winter Olympics in South Korea, where President Moon Jae-In hosted a high-level North Korean delegation. Kim Jong Un invited Moon to North Korea for a summit, which Moon said the two sides should work towards.

“Hearing the intention of President Moon Jae In for a summit from the special envoy of the south side, (Kim Jong Un) exchanged views and made a satisfactory agreement,” the North’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said of the meeting.

The agency did not provide details on what that agreement was but an official from the presidential Blue House in Seoul said it partially addressed the summit offer made by the North.

North Korea has been developing nuclear-tipped missiles capable of reaching the U. S. but Pyongyang and Washington both say they want a diplomatic solution.

Seoul’s delegation met Kim Jong Un, his sister Kim Yo Jong, Kim Jong Un’s wife and other officials on Monday, said Kim Eui-kyeom, a spokesman for the South’s presidential office. Kim Yo Jong attended the Winter Olympics opening ceremony in February.

The delegation will wrap up a two-day trip to Pyongyang later on Tuesday after another meeting with North Korean officials, the spokesman said.

Blue House officials could not confirm whether Kim Jong Un would be present at Tuesday’s meeting.

Chung said in Seoul before leaving on Monday his team would deliver the South Korean president’s wish to bring about denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula and permanent peace.

Kim Jong Un gave orders for “practical steps” regarding the letter from Moon that was delivered to him by the delegation, KCNA said without elaborating.

“He also made an exchange of in-depth views on the issues for easing the acute military tensions on the Korean Peninsula and activating the versatile dialogue, contact, cooperation and exchange,” the report said.

Both North Korea and the United States have said they are open to talks but the U.S. position has been that dialogue must be aimed at North Korea’s denuclearisation, something Pyongyang has rejected.

Moon has also remained vigilant against North Korea’s weapons ambitions, saying on Tuesday South Korea should bolster its defenses in tandem with talks with Pyongyang.

The Pentagon has nevertheless said it was “cautiously optimistic” about the North-South talks, which resumed in January for the first time in two years.

North Korea has vowed never to give up what it calls an essential deterrent against U.S. hostility. Pyongyang has not carried out any nuclear or missile tests since November.

Although the North is carrying out annual winter military exercises, it has not engaged in unusual behavior, according to South Korea’s defence ministry.

The Washington-based North Korea monitoring project, 38 North, said satellite images indicated North Korea’s main nuclear reactor may be operating, meaning that it had resumed production of plutonium, presumably for its nuclear weapons program.

Steam plumes were observed from the reactor in images from Feb. 17 and Feb. 25 and such vapor plumes had “generally been a useful indicator of reactor operations”, 38 North said in a report on Monday.

However, the report said no cooling water discharges had been observed.

That could mean the plumes were unrelated to reactor operations, or that the discharge pipeline had been extended into a nearby river in an attempt to disguise activity.

“The presence of ice melt on the river supports the conclusion that the reactor is indeed operating and that the outfall pipeline has been extended,” it said.

 

Kim Jong-un Executes Two Senior Officials Over Failed Nuclear Test

Two top officials of North Korean government has been executed by the country’s supreme leader, Kim Jong-un over mishaps at the country’s test missile site.

The latest unnamed executive was killed after he allegedly took responsibility for setbacks at the Punggye-ri nuclear base, which led to the date of a rocket launch being pushed back.

Five days ago, a high-ranking official once described as the ‘second most powerful man in North Korea’ disappeared from public life, sparking speculation he too may have been executed by death squads.

General Hwang Pyong-so once held the most senior military position in the hermit state as a Vice-Marshall after the supreme leader.

The most recent victim was said to be the director of Bureau 131, in charge of construction at Kim’s missile and nuclear bases.

Back in September, at least 200 workers were reportedly killed when a tunnel collapsed shortly after the detonation of an H-bomb.

It has been claimed the nuclear base, situated in the North Korean mountains, is falling into disrepair after being struck by earthquakes and landslides due to repeated nuke blasts.

A source told Japanese paper Asahi Shimbun: “It seems he took the blame as the prolonged mining of the nuclear facility pushed back the test date to September when it was initially set for spring.”

Kim has executed more than 340 people since he came to power – and that doesn’t include untold numbers sent to gulags or labour camps.

The so-called tubby tyrant is said to have been reshaping North Korea’s ruling elite in recent months as he fears the military is becoming too powerful.

He has also launched dozens of missiles this year, as well as detonating the hydrogen bomb on September 3.
Earlier this month Kim was pictured on top of a mountain he previously ‘climbed’ before executing top officials – sparking fears he was about to do the same again.

The tyrant visited the significant Mount Paektu, seen as mystical and situated not far from North Korea’s nuclear testing facilities, where Kim goes to make important decisions.

In 2016 he was pictured on the mountain before carrying out a huge nuclear test.

In April 2015 he visited the mountain then executed former defence chief Hyon Yong-chol.

In November 2013 he visited the mountain before killing uncle and political guardian Jang Song-thaek.

(Metro)

Missile Launch: North Korea Says They Still Have More Coming

North Korea had on Tuesday launched a missile across Japan that left citizens terrified. North Korea leader Kim Jong-Un has after the first launch promised more missile flights over Japan, insisting his nuclear-armed nation’s provocative launch was a mere “curtain-raiser”, in the face of UN condemnation and US warnings of severe repercussions.

The Hwasong-12 intermediate-range missile that Pyongyang unleashed on Tuesday represented a major escalation in the face of tensions over its weapons programmes.

In recent weeks it has threatened to send a salvo of missiles towards the US territory of Guam, while President Donald Trump has warned of raining “fire and fury” on the North.

After the latest launch Trump said that “all options” were on the table, reviving his implied threat of pre-emptive US military action just days after congratulating himself that Kim appeared to be “starting to respect us”.

The UN Security Council — which has already imposed seven sets of sanctions on Pyongyang — said in a unanimous statement the North’s actions “are not just a threat to the region, but to all UN member states”.

Both the North’s key ally China and Russia, which also has ties to it, backed the US-drafted declaration, but it will not immediately lead to new or tightened measures against Pyongyang.

The Rodong Sinmun newspaper, the mouthpiece of the North’s ruling party, on Wednesday carried more than 20 pictures of the launch near Pyongyang, one showing Kim smiling broadly at a desk with a map of the Northwest Pacific, surrounded by aides.

South Korea’s military said Tuesday that it had travelled around 2,700 kilometres (1,700 miles) and reached a maximum altitude of 550 kilometres.

The official Korean Central News Agency cited Kim as saying that “more ballistic rocket launching drills with the Pacific as a target in the future” were necessary.

Tuesday’s launch was a “meaningful prelude to containing Guam, advanced base of invasion”, he said, and a “curtain-raiser” for the North’s “resolute countermeasures” against ongoing US-South Korean military exercises which the North regards as a rehearsal for invasion.

Wednesday’s statement was the first time the North has acknowledged sending a missile over Japan’s main islands. Two of its rockets previously did so, in 1998 and 2009, but on both occasions it claimed they were space launch vehicles.